Common Core State Standards for Reading in California

Want to give your child a head start on what they need to know and will be learning when they enter kindergarten? Then keep reading…

Reading Standards for Literature Kindergarten

  1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  2. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
  3. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
  4. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  5. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems, fantasy, and realistic text). CA
  6. With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story.
  7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).
  8. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.
  9. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.
  10. Activate prior knowledge related to the information and events in texts. CA
  11. Use illustrations and context to make predictions about text. CA

 

Reading Standards for Informational Text Kindergarten

  1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  2. With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  3. With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
  4. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  5. Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book.
  6. Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a text.
  7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts).
  8. With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
  9. With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
  10. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.
  11. Activate prior knowledge related to the information and events in texts.
  12. Use illustrations and context to make predictions about text.

 

Reading Standards for Foundational Skills for Kindergarten

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.
  2. Follow words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by page.
  3. Recognize that spoken words are represented in written language by specific sequences of letters.
  4. Understand that words are separated by spaces in print.
  5. Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet.
  6. Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
  7. Recognize and produce rhyming words.
  8. Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words.
  9. Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.
  10. Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words.* (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)
  11. Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable words to make new words.
  12. Blend two to three phonemes into recognizable words. CA
  13. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words both in isolation and in text.
  14. Demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary sounds or many of the most frequent sounds for each consonant.
  15. Associate the long and short sounds with common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels. (Identify which letters represent the five major vowels [Aa, Ee, Ii, Oo, and Uu] and know the long and short sound of each vowel. More complex long vowel graphemes and spellings are targeted in the grade 1 phonics standards.)
  16. Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does).
  17. Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ.

Click link below to read the full Common Core State Standards for California .pdf…

Resource: http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/finalelaccssstandards.pdf

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Pete’s Monster ~ My New Friend

Pete’s Monster My New Friend, is a continuation from the first book called Pete’s Monster.

In the first book, the story ends with Pete escorts the Blue Monster to live in his older brother George’s bedroom. Even though the Blue Monster had not caused Pete any harm or concern for him to be afraid of the Blue Monster. Pete wanted the Monster out from under his bed and George’s room seemed the obvious place for the Monster to stay.

It wasn’t till in the second book, Pete’s Monster ~ My New Friend, that we watch a friendship grow.

PETE's MONSTER_My New Friend COVER resizedThe Blue Monster knocks at Pete’s bedroom door one night and asks to return to sleeping under Pete’s bed. Pete is happy that the Monster wants to come back as he missed his companion, the Blue Monster. His new friend.

Pete leaves his bedroom after lights out against his Mother’s orders. He goes into the kitchen to get his new Monster friend something to eat, after the Monster tells Pete that he is hungry.

Pete’s Monster ~ My New Friend is also a rhyming storybook. It subtly and creatively covers the topic of friendship and was created to inform children at an early age that a friend can be of any size, shape or color.

The moral in the first Pete’s Monster book is that you should never lash out and hurt anyone, (bullying) because the true person who gets hurt the most could end up being you as you could be labeled as a bully at school and no one will want to be your friend.

 

Please enjoy reading Pete’s Monster and if you have any questions, please contact us.

Pete's Monster kindle edition

Pete's Monster available on Amazon

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